Mississippi University for Women

College of Education and Human Sciences

Course Descriptions

Family Studies (FS)

Psychology (PSY)

Sociology (SOC)


FAMILY STUDIES (FS) COURSES

FS 203 Professional Issues. (2)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Family Studies program with an overall GPA of at least 2.0.

This course provides the student with information about the foundations of the discipline, including history and mission; discusses the role of professionals in meeting the needs of individuals and families; introduces students to professional standards, ethics, and career opportunities in the field; and presents the current status of family studies and related disciplines.

FS 290 Introduction of Research in Family Studies. (3)

Prerequisites:  PSY 201 and FS 203 with minimum grade of C.

Prepares students to perform basic research skills, including locating and summarizing published research in family studies.

FS 225 Management of Family Resources. (3)

Focuses on the practical application of management principles for use of all resources to maximize individual and family satisfactions.

FS 299 Special Topics. (1-6)

This course will address contemporary issues in the area of family studies.

FS 306 Marriage and the Family. (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies.

The purpose of this course is to study martial family interactions with emphasis on interpersonal dynamics and developmental tasks over the family life cycle. The course includes the study of sex role development, mate selection, adjustments within interpersonal relationships, communication in the family, parent-child relations, familial responses to stress, and family violence. Also listed as SOC 305.

FS 316 Issues in Families: Work & Violence (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 201

This course consists of two parts: work and family, and family violence.

Work and family: The first part of this course examines the interconnection between two institutions in society: the family and the workplace. This class offers the understanding of how jobs and workplaces affect family life; how family commitments influence the behaviors of workers and their ability; what extent existing policies meet the needs of working families.

Family violence: The second part of this course examines the overview of the study of family violence. This class offers the understanding of the major issues related to child abuse, intimate partner abuse, and elder abuse.  It also provides the dynamics of abuse, contributing factors, and types of interventions.

FS 330 Human Sexuality and Socialization. (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 201 with minimum grade of C.

This course examines the physiological, psychological, and social aspects of human sexuality and interaction throughout the lifespan.

FS 382 Theories in Family Studies. (3)

Prerequisites:  PSY 201, FS/SOC 305, and FS 290 with minimum grade of C.

This course will review the selected theories in family studies and familiarize students with the basic principles of major conceptual frameworks. This couse also focuses on fluency in applying the major theories in family studies to various research and everyday family life situations.

FS 401 Families and Public Policy. (3)

Prerequisites: FS/SOC 305 and PSY 201 with a minimum grade of C.

This course will address the needs of families through public policy. It will focus on the legislative process, implementation of law, as well as current and pending legislation in local, state and national government policies that directly effect families.

FS 430 Basic Counseling Skills. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 201 and 408.

This course introduces the student to an eclectic model for counseling and psychotherapy with an emphasis on developing the basic interpersonal skills necessary to be successful in a professional helping field. Also listed as PSY 430.

FS 465 Program Planning and Evaluation. (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 455 with a minimum grade of C.

This course is designed to introduce students to the process of creating life-skill programs for individuals and families. It will cover the principles of educational programming for non-academic settings in human service agencies and provide training in grant writing and program evaluation.

FS 467 Pre-Internship Orientation. (1)

Prerequisite: FS 468.

This course provides an orientation to and preparation for the family studies capstone course, FS 499: Field Experience in Family Studies Occupations. NOTE: Pass/Fail.

FS 468 Parenting in Contemporary Society. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 201, PSY 206, FS 290, and FS/SOC 305 with a minimum grade of C.

This course focuses on parenting issues from cross-cultural, historical, developmental, and ecological perspectives. Issues are specifically relevant to parenting children at different developmental stages, parenting in diverse ethnic groups, single-parent families, stepfamilies, dual-career families, and gay/lesbian and abusive parents.

FS 470 Health, Drugs and Chemical Dependencies. (3)

This courses assesses the implications of drug use on human health with a focus on drug actions and interactions, motivational factors that influence the use of drugs, and long-term societal effects of drug use.

FS 495 Independent Study in Family Studies. (1-3)

Must be arranged with the Family Studies coordinator. Students may choose a topic specific to personal interest or career objective.

FS 498 Special Topics in Family Studies. (1-6)

This course allows for flexibility in the offerings of coursework for students who are interested in topics beyond curriculum in the major.

FS 499 Field Experience in Family Studies Occupations. (6)

Prerequisite: The student must have completed all academic courses required in the Family Studies major with a minimum GPA of 2.5 or better and not more than one repeated class. The permission of the FS Field Experience Coordinator is also required.

This course requires the student to complete 280 hours of supervised field experience at approved locations. The purpose of this course is to provide the student with real-world experience in a selected setting and to establish professional-level relationships in the field of Human Services.

FS 570 Health, Drugs, and Chemical Dependencies. (3)

This course assesses the implications of drug use on human health with a focus on drug actions and interactions, motivational factors that influence the use of drugs, and long-term societal effects of drug use. The course will be available for elective credit to students in the graduate program in Health Education.

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PSYCHOLOGY (PSY) COURSES

PSY 101 General Psychology. (3)

This survey course introduces the student to contemporary theories and methods in psychology.

PSY 201 Introduction to APA Style. (1)

This course introduces the student to the professional writing style of the American Psychological Association (APA). Topics include ethics, quotation, citation of sources, and reference format.

PSY 202 Global Psychology. (3)

Global Psychology explores consciousness research that relates human consciousness to the science of quantum physics and evolutionary biology, connecting the human to the natural world and integrating schools of psychology with levels of the spectrum of consciousness; it shows how the world’s spiritual traditions are also consistent with current sciences.  The implications of this new knowledge point to the role of the human in the universe, living in harmony with planet Earth, enhancing unity with the realm of Spirit, and improving the health of body, mind, and spirit.  Global Psychology places psychology in an ecological context and draws on psychological insight for recognizing cultural pathologies leading to the possible destruction of the planet and exploring effective and sustainable lifestyles, environmental action, and world peace.


PSY 206 Human Growth and Development. (3)

This course introduces the student to the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of the individual throughout the lifespan.

PSY 302 Child Psychology. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 201 and 206.

An in-depth study of theory and research in child development from conception through late childhood with a focus on sensory, cognitive, social and personality development.

PSY 304 Abnormal Psychology. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 101 and 201.

This course focuses on the etiology, classification and treatment of psychopathological disorders.

PSY 305 Personality. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 101 and 201.

This course focuses on personality traits, which are individual characteristics that are relatively stable over time and situations. This course is based on a topical approach to current theories and research on personality.

PSY 320 Physiological Psychology. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 101 and 201.

This course examines the physiological bases of human behavior. Emphasis is placed on the structure and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems.

PSY 325 Adult Development. (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 206.

An in-depth study of physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development during adulthood .  The use of current research and theory to understand adult  development will be emphasized.


PSY 328 Adolescent Development. (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 206.

An in-depth study of physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development during adolescence.  The use of current research and theory to understand adolescent development will be emphasized.

PSY 340 Sensation and Perception. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 101 and 201.

This course provides an in-depth study of the physiological and neurological aspects of psychological development and human interaction with the environment.

PSY 350 Psychology of Women. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 101 or PSY 206 or permission of the Psychology and Family Studies Department Chair.

This course will present an overview of the biological, social, and cultural factors that affect women throughout the lifespan. Also listed as WS 352.

PSY 360 Educational Psychology. (3)

This course presents an overview of the process of learning. It provides students with skills needed to work with others in an educational setting. It includes coverage of theories of development, assessing and dealing with individual variability, devising objectives, learning theories, motivation, and measurement and evaluation of learning.

PSY 370 Social Psychology. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 101 and 201.

This course examines individual behavior in its social and cultural context. Theoretical and empirical examination of core social psychological issues, such as social cognition, social influence, interpersonal relationships, and group behavior, are emphasized.

PSY 405 Cognitive Psychology. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 101 and 201.

This course addresses the nature of cognitive processes. It focuses on the ways in which knowledge is acquired, stored and used, and emphasizes the relevance of the theories and research in cognitive psychology to mental activities in everyday life.

PSY 406 Cognitive Neuroscience. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 101 and 201. Also, it is recommended that the student take PSY 320 or PSY 340 before enrolling in this course.

How does the brain create the mind? This course will attempt to answer this question by providing an understanding of the role that the brain plays in visual cognition, memory, language, music, personality (both normal and abnormal), emotion, and gender differences in cognition by examining patterns of cognitive performance produced by both normal and brain-damaged populations.

PSY 407 Psychology of Criminal Behavior. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 201, and junior standing. PSY 305, 320, and/or 370 are recommended.

What is criminal behavior and how does our attitude about crime ultimately reflect our personal theory of human nature? Who becomes a criminal and why? And what relevance does psychology have for the processes of investigation and correction? This course will address these and other issues from primarily a psychological perspective, focusing on the personality, biological, cognitive, and emotional attributes of the criminal and potential criminal.

PSY 408 Introduction to Counseling and Clinical Psychology. (3)

Prerequisites: Permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies and PSY 201.

This course introduces the student to some of the major theories of personality and associated systems of counseling and psychotherapy; applications and limitations of the various systems, and principles of treatment and ethical standards.

PSY 410 Industrial and Organizational Psychology. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 201 and 370.

The purpose of this course is to examine factors within the field of organizational/industrial psychology such as employee motivation, selection and training, and organizational determinants of employee behavior. Major theories, models, research techniques, and findings of the science of I/O psychology will be emphasized in order to develop awareness and understanding of the aims and goals of the practice of I/O psychology.

PSY 425 Gender Development. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 302 or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies.

This course provides an in-depth study of theories and research on gender development from conception through middle childhood. Also listed as WS 425

PSY 430 Basic Counseling Skills. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 201 and PSY 408.

This course introduces the student to an eclectic model for counseling and psychotherapy with an emphasis on developing the basic interpersonal skills necessary to be successful in a professional helping field. Also listed as FS 430.

PSY 449 Practicum in Psychology. (1-3)

Prerequisites: Approval of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies and practicum coordinator and PSY 201.

The practicum experience provides the opportunity for a student to learn about teaching, research, or service aspect of the field of psychology. Students participate in a variety of learning activities designed to provide hands-on experience. Students may serve as practicum assistants in an introductory psychology course, in a faculty member’s research lab, in a human service agency, or another approved practicum site. Can be repeated for up to 6 hours.

PSY 450 Independent Study. (2-6)

Prerequisites: Twelve semester hours of Psychology and advanced standing, or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies and PSY 201.

In this course, the student develops the skills necessary to carry out psychological research. A written review of the literature on a selected topic, and a research project are examples of the type of work required.

PSY 454 Applied Statistics. (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 201.

This course introduces the student to current methods and applications of statistical procedures associated with common research designs.

PSY 455 Research in Human Behavioral Sciences. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 201 and 454.

This is a basic course in the application of current research methods in the field of human behavioral research. The student is introduced to the selection and formulation of a research problem, development of a hypothesis, data collection and analysis.

PSY 490 History and Systems of Psychology. (3)

Prerequisites: PSY 201 and advanced standing, with a minimum of 12 credit hours of upper-level psychology courses, or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies.

This course examines the philosophical and scientific roots of modern psychological thought. The origins of systems of psychology and the ways these systems were influenced by historical contexts and are reflected in contemporary psychology also are explored.

PSY 499 Special Topics in Psychology. (1-6)

Prerequisite: PSY 201.

This course allows flexibility in the offering of coursework for students who are interested in topics beyond the regular curriculum in the major.

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SOCIOLOGY (SOC) COURSES

SOC 201 Principles of Sociology. (3)

This introductory course provides an integral treatment of the fundamental principles of human association. Consideration is given to the nature of certain important social relationships, structures, and processes in which the student participates in home and community life, and to the understanding concerning them, which are derived from cultural anthropology and social psychology. An analysis is made of the structure and functions of major American social institutions, the ways in which they change, and the problems in contemporary society resulting from these changes.

SOC 299 Special Topics in Sociology. (1-3; may be repeated for a maximum of six total credit hours)

This course will address contemporary issues and advanced content areas in sociology.

SOC 303 Social Problems. (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 206, SOC 201, or permission of the Psychology and Family Studies Department Chair.

The purpose of this course is to give students the opportunity to investigate some of the major social problems of our changing society. The problem, theoretical explanations concerning causation and possibilities for remedial action are examined. Major problems discussed are: crime, sexual deviation, the population crisis, drug abuse and urban problems.

SOC 305 Marriage and the Family. (3)

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies.

The purpose of this course is to study martial family interactions with emphasis on interpersonal dynamics and developmental tasks over the family life cycle. The course includes the study of sex role development, mate selection, adjustments within interpersonal relationships, communication in the family, parent-child relations, familial responses to stress, and family violence. Also listed as FS 306.

SOC 311 Communities. (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 201 or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies.

This course investigates two broad areas of community knowledge: 1) the nature of community life, including the physical structure and growth of the city, the process of urbanization and its consequences, and 2) community organization of rural areas. The course includes a project that directly involves the student on an interaction basis with some aspect of community dynamics.

SOC 359 Juvenile Justice System. (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 201 or permission of the Psychology and Family Studies Department Chair.

This course provides the student a view of the nature, extent, and causal explanations of the problem of juvenile delinquency. The perspective taken involves an examination of the roles of the police, the courts, correction agencies, and other agencies dealing with the delinquent and his/her rehabilitation.

SOC 363 Criminology. (3)

Prerequisite: SOC 201 or permission of the Department Chair Psychology and Family Studies.

This course will examine crime; its causes, prevention and treatment; the nature, types and extent of crime; and preventive and correctional programs as part of the criminal justice system. Emphasis will be placed on integrating social process and social structural explanations of criminal behavior.

SOC 456 Minorities. (3)

Prerequisite: Six semester hours in Human Behavioral Sciences courses, advanced standing, or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies.

A study of the cultural heritage of various groups and an analysis of the changing place and role of minorities in American Society. Special attention is paid to organizational development and the role of conflict in the creation of ethnic consciousness, sexism, political awareness, and group cohesion. Contemporary problems involving minority groups are evaluated from the historical, social, and remedial points of view.

SOC 458 Sociology of Low Income Groups. (3)

Prerequisite: Six semester hours in Human Behavioral Sciences or permission of the Department Chair of Psychology and Family Studies.

This course analyzes poverty and its accompanying lifestyle. It acquaints the student with problems associated with low income and poverty and possible means of remediation, and critically evaluates the relationships among the different areas of our socioeconomic system and their influences on poverty. The course also deals with the differences in poverty among the poor white and the poor black. The course is designed for persons entering service vocations who will have significant contact with persons in the poverty syndrome.

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